Green Deals Suaoki Solar Camping Light with USB 5 more

first_imgSuaoki via Amazon offers its LED Solar Camping Light with USB for $4.99 shipped when promo code 5AUA7WR4 is applied during checkout. For comparison, it typically sells for over $15 with today’s offer being the best we’ve tracked in 18 months. Charge your lantern anywhere with a built-in solar panel. It can also be powered via USB, as well. Rated 4.1/5 stars by over 1,000 Amazon customers. more…The post Green Deals: Suaoki Solar Camping Light with USB $5, more appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Lyfts new Green Mode lets riders request an EV

first_imgLyft is bringing a new “Green Mode” to its app which allows riders to specifically request an EV or hybrid vehicle. more…The post Lyft’s new ‘Green Mode’ lets riders request an EV appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

PlugIn Electric Car Sales Increased In China In February

first_img BYD Reveals Plans For All-New E Series Of Electric Cars Even in the slowest month, plug-in car sales exceeded 50,000According to the EV Sales Blog, sales of plug-in electric cars in China amounted in February to close to 53,000, which is 58% more thana year ago at a market share of 4.3%. All those number are like another world to the 17% collapse of overall car market in China.Three-quarter of sales falls on all-electric models, which also found 58% more buyers, as the plug-in hybrids grew by 18%.After the first two months of 2019, sales exceed 150,000 at an average market share of 4.7% and a chance to cross 2 million in 2019.China news Plug-in electric car sales in China – February 2019The five best selling models for the month includes three BYD, which achieved a 22% share in the plug-in car segment:BYD Yuan BEV – 4,332 (14,425 YTD)BYD Tang PHEV – 3,216 (10,124 YTD)SAIC Baojun E100 – 1,011 (9,323 YTD)Chery eQ – 3,157 (6,532 YTD)Geely Emgrand EV – 3,895 (6,470 YTD)Tesla Model 3 sales in February were too low to catch onto the radar.Interestingly, the top two models are now from BYD, which holds the biggest market share of 27%, compared to 12% for  SAIC, 8% for Geely and 5% for BAIC.Source: EV Sales Blog Source: Electric Vehicle News Geely Starts Pre-Sales Of New Jihe A Electric Sedan UPDATE: Tesla Gigafactory 3 Is Under Construction At Night Too: Video Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 30, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

Sweden To Test Dynamic Wireless Charging On Island Of Gotland

first_imgWireless charging Source: Electric Vehicle News WiTricity Acquires Qualcomm Halo Wireless Charging Assets The road that would power the car… sounds too good to be trueThe Smart Road Gotland consortium won the Swedish Transport Administration (Trafikverket)’s tender for demonstration road system with dynamic wireless power transfer on the island of Gotland.The project includes retrofitting of 1.6 km (1 mile) out of 4.1 km (2.5 miles) route between the airport and city center of Visby to enable electric cars and truck/buses to operate without charging.“To enable the mission-critical knowledge transfer to the Swedish Transport Administration, the Smart Road Gotland consortium will deploy a fully functional public shuttle service and test bed through a 1.6 km long electric road as part of the total route of 4.1 km between the airport and city center of Visby on the idyllic island of Gotland, an eco-municipality in the middle of the Baltic Sea.” Volvo Group Invests In Momentum Dynamics For Wireless Charging The core technology to be provided by ElectReon, Israeli startup founded in 2013. One of the points of the project is test of the electric truck over varied seasonal conditions.In theory, embedding dynamic wireless charging system in main roads would enable to significantly decrease the required battery capacity and prices of electric cars, as well as their need for charging points. The drawback s however need to build the infrastructure in roads, retrofit the cars and efficiency, as well as standardization.Budget of the demonstration project is 116 million SEK (around $12.5 million).Smart Road Gotland synopsisTechnology: Dynamic mobile wireless power transfer, https://www.electreon.com/technologyInvisible installation to road users (coils deployed 8 cm under the surface) and activated only when corresponding vehicle drives on top of itLocated in Visby, Gotland, the Swedish island in the Baltic Sea, an eco-municipality1.6 km of the 4.1 km airport route will be electrifiedCompatible with all types of EVs, including buses, trucks, passenger cars, including self-driving vehicles (a typical passenger car can be equipped with just one 12 kg receptor, heavier vehicles can have more units to optimise charging levels)The main project mission is acquiring knowledge for the Swedish Transport Administration, including demonstrating the environmental and commercial benefitsWorld Ecological Forum and Gotland GPe Circuit AB/GotlandRing initially contacted Electreon (Tel Aviv listed public company) to initiate a demonstration test bed on Gotland, which is now realised thanks to TrafikverketBudget for the public-private project: SEK 116 M Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 20, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }Full press release:A first-of-its-kind dynamic electric road system will be built in SwedenToday, the Swedish Transport Administration (Trafikverket) announced the pre-commercial procurement results for the electric road system tender.The consortium Smart Road Gotland (Gotland GPe Circuit AB as its applicant) won the final round of the tender with the highest evaluation points, despite the much bigger industrial competitors.Electreon AB (a wholly owned subsidiary of Electreon Wireless) will lead the project’s next phase to provide vital knowledge of the future potential of dynamic wireless mobile power transfer through this demonstration road system.This public-private initiative, based on Electreon’s leading technology, will be the first in the world to charge inductively both an electric truck and a bus while in full motion.To enable the mission-critical knowledge transfer to the Swedish Transport Administration, the Smart Road Gotland consortium will deploy a fully functional public shuttle service and test bed through a 1.6 km long electric road as part of the total route of 4.1 km between the airport and city center of Visby on the idyllic island of Gotland, an eco-municipality in the middle of the Baltic Sea.The electric truck will be test-driven by a professional in varied seasonal conditions to ensure that the system is ready for large-scale projects on highways.As an integral strategic step towards implementing the Swedish government’s national roadmap for electric road systems, the Smart Road Gotland project will create a vital learning curve for the authority.Long haul heavy trucks benefit significantly from the Electreon solution since no heavy and costly batteries, nor stops for charging, are needed. This optimal solution enables installation of electric road systems without the environmental impact (benefits are both physical and visual) of a conductive system.After acquiring relevant ERS demonstration results, the Swedish Transport Administration can evaluate the potential for larger scale electric road investments.Initially, Gotland GPe Circuit AB (GotlandRing, world’s first sustainable race and test circuit) – with the support of World Ecological Forum (a global crossover sustainability network, a facilitator and enabler of green business and entrepreneurship) started the project in co-operation with Electreon– ‘For the whole consortium, it’s wonderful news that we have been selected as the top candidate. It is of utmost importance to significantly reduce CO2-emissions within the transport sector. To commence with the heavier transports is logical since the biggest emission improvements can be gained where the usage and tonnage is the highest. The future positive impact could be global.’, comments Alec Arho-Havrén, CEO/Founder Gotland GPe Circuit/GotlandRing and World Ecological Forum.– ‘We, the Swedish Transport Administration, believe that electric roads are an important contribution to reducing CO2-emissions from heavy transportation. Demonstrating and evaluating new technical solutions for electric routes is one of our most important steps in our long-term plan for a potential rollout of electrified routes on the heavy road network in Sweden.’, says Jan Pettersson, program manager, Trafikverket (The Swedish Transport Administration)– ‘We are excited that we have been selected to take part in the Swedish government’s ambitious program to examine and implement electric road technology as a solution to electrify heavy trucks on highways. Electreon’s wireless electric road technology makes it possible to electrify truck fleets economically without the need to carry huge batteries and stop for charging and without creating a visual hazard. The selection of Electreon by the Swedish government after careful filtration testifies to the recognition of the potential of the technology to bring the global electrification revolution to the next critical stage of full implementation.’, Oren Ezer, CEO of Electreon, comments.– ‘It is exciting and positive that Trafikverket wants to see this unique technology and test bed realised on Gotland. It strengthens the image of Gotland as one of the most innovative and climate smart regions in the world.’, says the chairwoman of the regional government, Eva Nypelius (C).The Smart Road Gotland consortium members include:Electreon AB – a fully owned Swedish subsidiary of Electreon wireless (publicly traded on the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange, a leader in dynamic wireless power transfer technologyEiTech – a Swedish subsidiary of Vinci, one of the world’s biggest infrastructure and construction companiesRISE RESEARCH INSTITUTES OF SWEDEN – Sweden’s research institute and innovation partner and a leading research institute in the field of electric roadsGotland GPe Circuit AB, Gotland Ring – world’s first sustainable race and test circuit, traffic electrification partner for the vehicle industryWorld Ecological Forum – a global crossover sustainability network, a facilitator and enabler of green business and entrepreneurship (project initiator)Matters Group – a sustainability consultancyFlygbussarna – a local Swedish public transportation operator owned by TransDev, formerly Veolia TransDev, a French international public transport operator, with operations in 20 countriesSwedavia – the Swedish airport authorityDan transport – Israel’s leading bus operator and a strategic investor in Electreon will provide a HIGER E-Bus based on SupercapacitorHutchinson – a leading French manufacturer will manufacture the underground coilsEco-municipality of Gotland – the most popular tourist destination summer time, an eco regionGEAB – utility company, electricity supplier (owned 75% by Vattenfall, 25% by the municipality)Smart Road Gotland synopsisTechnology: Dynamic mobile wireless power transfer, https://www.electreon.com/technologyInvisible installation to road users (coils deployed 8 cm under the surface) and activated only when corresponding vehicle drives on top of itLocated in Visby, Gotland, the Swedish island in the Baltic Sea, an eco-municipality1.6 km of the 4.1 km airport route will be electrifiedCompatible with all types of EVs, including buses, trucks, passenger cars, including self-driving vehicles (a typical passenger car can be equipped with just one 12 kg receptor, heavier vehicles can have more units to optimise charging levels)The main project mission is acquiring knowledge for the Swedish Transport Administration, including demonstrating the environmental and commercial benefitsWorld Ecological Forum and Gotland GPe Circuit AB/GotlandRing initially contacted Electreon (Tel Aviv listed public company) to initiate a demonstration test bed on Gotland, which is now realised thanks to TrafikverketBudget for the public-private project: SEK 116 MAbout ElectreonElectreon Wireless is an Israeli publicly traded company developing DWPT (Dynamic wireless power transfer) technology. The technology enables a shared infrastructure that significantly reduced the need to charge vehicles’ batteries during day/overnight and decreases the size of the battery. It can support any type of EV – buses, trucks, and passenger vehicles. It is fully compatible for autonomous and self-driving EVs. Electreon is a global leader in its field because of its deep technological capabilities and focus on making the technology cost effective, durable and efficient.Smart Energy Road and Traffic System (SERTS) synopsisSmart Energy Road and Traffic System (SERTS), an energy harvesting smart infrastructure, finalist i InfraAwards 2017, testbeds planned on GotlandRing in the futureThe vision is to enable access to limitless sustainable energy through smart infrastructure development and simultaneously urge the paradigm for e-mobility. Our mission is to develop and commercialise an energy harvesting electric road system, a modular, self healing micro smart grid with wireless, mobile dynamic charging for electric vehicles.Unique combination of solar, thermal, wind, kinetic, and hydraulic energy harvesting technology that provides decentralised and secure energyInnovative infrastructure with options – in road, covered tiling, contoured (roadside) solar panels, can also be combined with existing roadSynergetic systems for energy harvesting, capture, storage of 100% renewable energyEnables smart e-mobility on a large scale and solves range anxietyElectreon’s dynamic wireless power transfer is an important planned feature for the SERTSGotlandRing/Gotland GPe Circuit AB synopsisWorld’s first sustainable race and test circuit, traffic electrification and new model launch partner for the vehicle industryLocated in a former limestone quarryGreen business campus and eco resort development areaAbout to enter an expansion phase making it the longest modern standard race circuit in the world Taxis In Oslo Will Be Electric & Wirelessly Fast Chargedlast_img read more

Mulling Over Mosers Recent FCPA Remarks

first_imgRecently Sandra Moser (Principal Deputy Chief, Fraud Section, DOJ) delivered these remarks (provided to me by the DOJ) at an event titled “Global Forum on Anti-Corruption in High Risk Markets.”This post provides commentary on the remarks ranging from how best to incentivize compliance, the U.S. “piling” on foreign law enforcement actions, individual accountability, DOJ transparency in resolving FCPA enforcement actions, and the DOJ’s FCPA Pilot Program.Moser began her remarks as follows:“We stand at a critical juncture in the fight against transnational corruption.  And the importance of this fight cannot be overstated.  The impact of corruption is unambiguous.  Because of the efforts of prosecutors in countries across the globe—some of them the very definition of high risk—the curtain has been ripped back/ revealing deep-rooted and pervasive corruption up to the highest levels of governance/ and putting on display for the world to see its devastating effects:The way that corruption undermines the rule of law and destabilizes economies; the link between corruption and terrorism and the attendant threat to global security; the erosion of the free and fair market and, with it, the public’s confidence.Here at home, foreign corruption puts American companies that are playing by the rules at a competitive disadvantage, resulting in significant and tangible harm to business, employees and shareholders.Blunting corruption’s corrosive effects depends on rigorous enforcement of anti-corruption laws to be sure.  But, of course, it also depends on you.  Because just like the impact of corruption, the impact of compliance is plain.  So, today, I would like to talk to you about both efforts.”During her speech, Moser encouraged the compliance audience to “be better, do better” and stated:“Invest in compliance now rather than using that would-be investment to pay a criminal fine down the road.  Empower your compliance executives by giving them their rightful seat at the table and listening to what they have to say.  Don’t put them in the awkward position of having to sit before the Department and defend a program that they fought to make better and were denied the resources or backing to see through.Elsewhere, Moser stated:“So, the message should be clear – Wherever the locus of misconduct and whatever the industry, compliance must continue to play an increased role.  Law enforcement and regulators don’t want to be going at this alone.As I said on the onset of my remarks, the impact of corruption is glaring but, so too, is the impact of compliance when taken seriously and approached with sincerity and commitment.  Let’s all continue to strive to be better and do better in the struggle to combat global corruption.”In other words, add Moser to the long list of government officials who have nicely articulated the policy rationale for an FCPA compliance defense (see here for a recent post on the same subject).If the DOJ was truly interested in companies “investing” in compliance, “empowering” compliance executives and making sure that compliance executives had the “resources or backing” they need, the DOJ would support – not reject as it long has – an FCPA compliance defense. (See here for a prior post among many others on this subject).Back to Moser’s speech in which she stated:“The Fraud Section is doing our part to try to be better and do better.We are working harder than ever to coordinate with global partners and avoid what some have termed “piling on” in attendant global resolutions.We are taking additional steps to enhance our enforcement of the FCPA against both corporate and individual actors, and to promote transparency in doing so.And we are endeavoring to work smarter and more efficiently through increased internal coordination to combat bribery and fraud regardless of the market or industry.”There is much to mull over here.Let’s start with the “piling on” comment.As highlighted in this recent post of the 27 corporate enforcement actions from 2016, 11 (41%) were against foreign companies (based in many instances on mere listing of securities on U.S. markets and in a few instances on sparse allegations of a U.S. nexus in furtherance of an alleged bribery scheme). Even more dramatic, of the net $2.27 billion settlement amounts from 2016 corporate enforcement actions, approximately $1.44 billion (63%) resulted from enforcement actions against foreign companies. All of the foreign companies that resolved 2016 FCPA enforcement actions were from peer OECD Convention countries.Regarding individual prosecutions, as highlighted in this recent post since September 2015 there have been nearly 20 corporate FCPA enforcement actions brought by the DOJ and not one has resulted (at least yet) in any DOJ charges against company employees.Zero. Zilch. Nada.Regarding transparency, it’s difficult to take Moser’s comment seriously given that the DOJ’s last two corporate enforcement actions (see here and here) contained between one paragraph (CD Smith) to one page (Linde) of substantive allegations. It’s also difficult to take her comment seriously given that the DOJ refused to provide basic factual information regarding these enforcement actions (see here).Moser next stated:“From an enforcement perspective, I stand before you more confident than ever that we are well-positioned to remain at the forefront of the fight against corruption.  Not just because of the efforts of our prosecutors and law enforcement agents, which I’ll discuss in more detail, but also because I can safely say we are not alone in this fight.  Not even close.  In the past, commentators concluded that the U.S. was going it alone.  That we were the world’s policeman.  That can no longer be said.  Countries like Brazil, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Germany, the United Kingdom, and many, many more are not just joining the fray but are taking a leading role.  These countries have watched the United States, they have worked with us, they have learned from us, and they are now following the example we set, in some cases, actually adopting tools that we employ. One need look no further than Brazil to see how far and how fast a country can come in confronting corruption head on.  It is truly remarkable what they have done, and they are not slowing down.Certain of these countries are also establishing their own mechanisms for reaching resolutions with corporations.  Countries like the United Kingdom, France, and Australia have begun using deferred prosecution agreements and non-prosecution agreements as an alternative to the binary choice of prosecuting a company or walking away from the case entirely.  This allows those countries to reward and incentivize good corporate behavior, like voluntarily self-disclosing, cooperating and remediating by, among other things, making a real commitment to compliance. Importantly, it also allows these countries to account for situations where there might exist significant collateral consequences to a company if it were to plead guilty or be indicted.”Actually, the U.K. specifically rejected use of non-prosecution agreement noting that they:“[Are] unsuitable for the constitutional arrangements and legal traditions in England and Wales.  We have concluded that [NPAs] are not suitable for this jurisdiction due to their markedly lesser degree of transparency, including the absence of judicial oversight.” (See here for the prior post).Moreover, correct me if I am wrong, but neither France nor Australia use non-prosecution agreements to resolve bribery offenses.As to Moser’s comment that other countries “have learned from us, and they are now following the example we set, in some cases, actually adopting tools that we employ,” this is a curious statement given that the other countries that have adopted DPAs have materially different DPA regimes compared to the U.S.Moser’s statement that alternative resolution vehicles “allow those countries to reward and incentivize good corporate behavior, like voluntarily self-disclosing, cooperating and remediating by, among other things, making a real commitment to compliance” has zero empirical evidence support.As highlighted in this prior post, in the past the DOJ was specifically asked by the OECD to provide information about the deterrent effect of DPAs and NPAs and the DOJ merely responded as follows:“Scholars have recognized that quantifying deterrence is extremely difficult. This is equally true for the deterrent effect of DPAs and NPAs. Thus, as discussed at the time this recommendation was made, measuring ‘the impact of NPAs and DPAs in deterring the bribery of foreign public officials’ would be a difficult task, save providing certain anecdotal and other circumstantial evidence.”Moser next stated: “In 2016, the Fraud Section’s FCPA Unit resolved 13 corporate matters with fines exceeding $1.3 billion.”The reason I highlight this sentence is because the number of corporate matters the DOJ references in 2016 (13) is consistent with the core approach to keeping FCPA statistics, that I have long maintained is the proper way to keep FCPA statistics, and rejects the many creative and haphazard way that many FCPA Inc. participants keep FCPA statistics that make FCPA enforcement appear more robust than it actually is. (See here). Moreover, the 13 figure cited by the DOJ includes the 2 declination with disgorgements from 2016 (as will be highlighted in a future post some commentators advance the absurd position that these are not actual FCPA enforcement actions).Most next stated:“Coordination with foreign countries will continue, and that number of coordinated resolutions will grow, including with new countries.  This is important for several reasons.  First and foremost, it is fair to companies.  It encourages companies to cooperate across the board, because we understand that, at the end of a case, money paid out is derived from one pie.  A resolving company should not have piled upon it duplicative fines via separate resolutions that do not credit one another.  Although the “piling on” problem is not entirely solved by doing this (other countries may certainly try to reach additional resolutions), our efforts do mitigate this problem, and we are trying to do better in this regard.”[…]Coordination, of course, signals strong relationships between the United States and global partners.  Such coordination should also clearly signal to companies doing business on the international stage the necessity for consistent rules of the road when it comes to compliance.  Anti-corruption policies should apply with equal force across a business, no matter what its size and regardless of the perceived local practices of high risk markets.   Without such consistency there cannot be real confidence in compliance efforts.  Employees left to their own devices, especially in high risk markets, leave themselves and their companies exposed and vulnerable.”Moser also stated: “more than ever before, we are prosecuting and convicting employees and officials involved in transnational corruption, including in high risk markets.”Portions of this statement are false.As highlighted in this previous post, DOJ individual FCPA prosecutions in 2016 and 2015 were fewer than in 2014 and DOJ individual prosecutions in 2014 were fewer than in 2013. Moreover, as mentioned above, since September 2015 there have been nearly 20 corporate FCPA enforcement actions brought by the DOJ and not one has resulted (at least yet) in any DOJ charges against company employees.Indeed, approximately 80% of DOJ corporate FCPA enforcement actions since 2006 have not resulted in any DOJ charges against company employees. Compare this to the fact that from 1977 to 2004 approximately 90% of DOJ corporate FCPA enforcement actions resulted in related charges against company employees. In other words, measured against corporate enforcement action, related individual prosecutions are at historic lows.But perhaps this will be changing as Moser stated:“and we will be announcing numerous additional pleas in the coming months.  Although sometimes we charge or plead out individuals under seal in furtherance of our ongoing investigations, I can share that the number of just those pleas which will be publicly-announced this year will still far exceed totals in past years.”Related to individual prosecutions, Moser also stated:“we are also convicting individuals at trial … These convictions makes clear we are taking cases to trial no matter how challenging – and make no mistake, FCPA cases are rife with difficulties.  We are nonetheless securing guilty verdicts.”Moser then cherry-picked a few recent examples and yes, as highlighted recently on FCPA Professor, for the first time in six years the DOJ did prevail in a contested FCPA action when put to its ultimate burden of proof. Yet, as highlighted in the post, the previous five DOJ trials were debacles.Moser next stated:“How else are we trying to do better?  Over the course of the last 15 months, the Fraud Section’s FCPA Unit also has done better at making transparent those considerations that color corporate resolutions.  Through the pilot program announced in April 2016, we offered clearer guidelines not only internally to our own prosecutors, but to companies and their employees, regarding what is required to receive full credit under its auspices.  What it means to timely voluntarily self-disclose misconduct, to fully cooperate and to remediate.  We continue to evaluate the virtue of the program but certain of the limited data available is striking:  Of the companies that resolved during the first year of the pilot program, those that voluntarily self-disclosed obtained either a declination with disgorgement of illicit profits or a non-prosecution agreement with no less than a 50% reduction off of the low end of the Guidelines range.  To say it another way:  Of these resolving companies, none entered a guilty plea, none entered into a DPA and none had a monitor appointed. By contrast, of those companies that did not voluntarily self-disclose, roughly 80% resolved through a guilty plea or DPA, none received more than 25% off of the low end of the Guidelines, and about 72% had a monitor appointed.   This is powerful information to consider when it comes time for a company to weigh carrots and sticks.”Sure, since the April 2016 pilot program was announced the DOJ has announced 7 matters as being resolved “consistent” with the pilot program; however all of these matters were believed to be in the DOJ’s FCPA “pipeline” prior to the pilot program being announced. In other words, there has not yet been (it is believed) a “pure” pilot program resolution (i.e. conduct disclosed post April 2016 and resolved).Moreover, Moser’s statements about NPA’s and reductions off the low end of the Guidelines range ignores the fact that these things were occurring prior to the pilot program being announced (see here for a prior post).As highlighted in this prior post,  it is difficult (if not impossible) to empirically assess whether one of the Pilot Program’s goals (to increase corporate voluntarily disclosures) is actually working. Simply put, many business organizations were voluntarily disclosing prior to the April 2016 Pilot Program and the precise question after the Pilot Program is whether the program is motivating voluntary disclosures to a greater extent than prior to the program. Yet, as highlighted in the same post, it is possible to assess whether another of the DOJ’s stated “main goals” of its Pilot Program is working and at present the undeniable answer is that, as measured against this “main goal,” the Pilot Program is currently failing.Moser also stated as follows:“On the international side, in recent years healthcare companies have come before the Fraud Section in connection with FCPA violations.  Investigations have revealed that healthcare companies operating overseas frequently interact with state-employed doctors and foreign public officials who work for government-owned hospitals and medical institutions.  In addition, publicly funded and administered foreign health care programs are invariably run by government officials, which means that, to do business in these countries, a company must deal with government officials.  As a result, we have seen a number of significant FCPA cases involving the payment of bribes and kickbacks by healthcare companies to foreign officials to obtain a wide variety of improper business advantages.”What is interesting about the above statement is that the DOJ has used the enforcement theory that physicians and others associated with foreign health care systems are “foreign officials” in approximately 25 corporate enforcement actions, but the DOJ has never prosecuted an individual based on this theory. Elevate Your Research Elevate Your FCPA Research There are several subject matter tags in this post. However, only subscribers to FCPA Professor’s premium search feature can see and use them in research. Efficient and cost-effective FCPA research is just a click away.last_img read more

Turkey

first_img Donate Support This Free Public Website FCPA Professor is widely regarded as a leading source of FCPA news and commentary. All of this takes time, money, and substantial effort. Thus, if FCPA Professor adds value to your practice or business, please consider a donation. I hope this Thanksgiving finds you enjoying and being thankful for many things in your life.Among the many things I am thankful for are your readership and I hope FCPA Professor elevates your FCPA knowledge and skills.May your turkey be golden brown.The following FCPA enforcement actions have involved, in whole or in part, alleged improper conduct in Turkey.Smith & Wesson (2014)In July 2014, Smith & Wesson agreed to resolve an SEC administrative order finding violations of the FCPA’s anti-bribery provisions, books and records provisions and internal controls provisions. The SEC’s findings included business conduct in Pakistan, Indonesia, Turkey, Nepal and Bangladesh.As to Turkey, the SEC’s order states: “Similarly, Smith &Wesson made improper payments in 2009 to its third party agent in Turkey, who indicated that part of the payments would be provided to Turkish officials in an attempt to secure two deals in Turkey for sale of handcuffs to Turkish police and firearms to the Turkish military. Neither of these interactions resulted in the shipment of products, as Smith & Wesson was unsuccessful bidding for the first deal, while the latter deal was ultimately canceled.”Without admitting or denying the SEC’s findings, Smith & Wesson agreed to pay approximately $2.0 million. (See here).Tyco International (2012)In September 2012, Tyco International agreed to resolve a wide-ranging DOJ/SEC enforcement action regarding alleged conduct in the following countries: China, India, Thailand, Laos, Indonesia, Bosnia, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia, Slovakia, Iran, Saudia Arabia, Libya, Syria, the United Arab Emirates, Mauritania, Congo, Niger, Madagascar, and Turkey.As to Turkey, the enforcement action stated as follows.  The products of a division of an indirect subsidiary of Tyco “were sold through a sales representative to government entities in Turkey.  The sales representatives sold the SigInt equipment in Turkey at an approximately twelve to forty percent mark-up over the price at which he purchased the equipment from M/A-Com and also received a commission on one of the sales.  The sales representative transferred part of his commission and part of his mark-up to a government official in Turkey to obtain orders.  In connection with these improper transactions, M/A-Com earned approximately $71,770 in gross proft.” The SEC’s complaint cites an internal e-mail which stated:  “hell, everyone knows you have to bribe somebody to do business in Turkey.”Total fines and penalties in the enforcement action were approximately $26.8 million (approximately $13.7 million in the DOJ enforcement action and approximately $13.1 million in the SEC enforcement action). (See here).Daimler AG (2010)In March 2010, Damiler AG agreed to settle a wide-ranging FCPA enforcement action alleging that “between 1998 and January 2008, Daimler made hundreds of improper payments worth tens of milions of dollars to foreign officials in at least 22 countries – including China, Croatia, Egypt, Greece, Hungary, Indonesia, Iraq, Ivory Coast, Latvia, Nigeria, Russia, Serbia and Montenegro, Thailand, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Vietnam, and others – to assist in securing contracts with government customers for the purchase of Daimler vehicles valued at hundreds of milions of dollars.”As to Turkey, the criminal information (here) charges that Daimler’s Corporate Audit Department “discovered three binders located in a safe at MB Turk’s [a Daimler subsidiary in Turkey] offices in Istabul” that, along with other evidence, demonstrated that “MB Turk made approximately €6.05 million in payments to third parties in connection with vehicle export transactions that involved the sale of vehicles to non-Turkish government customers in North Korea, Latvia, Bulgaria, Libya, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, and other countries in deals with revenues of approximately €95 million.” According to the information, at least €3.88 million of the €6.05 million comprised of “improper payments and gifts […] paid to foreign government officials or to third parties with the understanding that the payments and gifts would be passed on, in whole or in part, to foreign government officials to assist in securing the sale of Daimler vehicles to government customers.”Daimler agreed to pay $185 million in combined DOJ and SEC fines and penalties (see here).York International Corp. (2007)In October 2007, York International Corporation (York), a global provider of heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration products and services, agreed to pay approximately $22 million in combined fines and penalties to settle DOJ and SEC enforcement actions principally relating to improper payments made by various subsidiaries to the Iraqi government under the United Nations Oil-for-Food Program. The enforcement action also involved certain other improper payments made in connection with government projects in Bahrain, Egypt, India, Turkey and the United Arab Emirates. (see here).Delta & Pine Land Co. (2007)In July 2007, the SEC announced a settled FCPA enforcement action against Delta & Pine Land Company, a Mississippi-based cottonseed company, and its subsidiary, Turk Deltapine, Inc. According to the SEC, between 2001 – 2006, Turk Deltapine made payments of approximately $43,000 to officials of the Turkish Ministry of Agricultural and Rural Affairs in order to obtain various governmental reports and certifications that were necessary for Turk Deltapine to obtain, retain and operate its business in Turkey. Per the complaint, the improper payments were discovered by Delta & Pine, but instead of halting the payments, the payments continued via a third party supplier and pursuant to an inflated invoice scheme. Based on the above conduct, Delta & Pine and Turk Deltapine jointly agreed to pay a $300,000 civil penalty and engage an independent compliance consultant. (see here and here).Micrus Corp. (2005)In March 2005, Micrus Corporation, a privately-held California medical device manufacturer, agreed to a two year non-prosecution agreement with the DOJ to resolve its FCPA liability in connection with over $100,000 in payments (disguised in the company’s books and records as stock options, honorariums and commissions) to physicians employed at publicly owned and operated hospitals in France, Turkey, Spain, and Germany.(see here) and here).last_img read more

Head in the Sand

first_imgby, Eilon Caspi, ChangingAging GuestbloggerTweetShare20ShareEmail20 Shares“Our problem is not just that we don’t know the future, we don’t know much of the past either” – Nassim Nicholas Taleb, author, The Black Swan Illustration by Yuval CaspiA 90 years old resident with Alzheimer’s disease was living in a “memory care” unit of an assisted living residence (ALR) in Minnesota. One evening in 2016, while lying in her bed she called for staff help 99 times over 39 minutes. Nobody came to assist her. Then, around 8:30pm, she fell off the bed. While lying on the floor, she continued to call and cry out for help for 143 times (including multiple loud banging on the bed rail using her small wooden cross). At some point she cried out, “Please help me Lord.” Nobody came to assist her. In total, she called and cried out for help 242 times over the course of an hour and 38 minutes.It was only after her daughter who watched the incident remotely on a hidden camera alerted the staff to the fall that they came to assist her. A staff member who came into her bedroom asked her, “Were you calling for help?”When the family showed staff the video of the fall, their response, as reported by another daughter, was, “This is the assisted living model. If she was at home and had hired another home health group to come in, she would have experienced the same thing.”This daughter reported that a similar incident occurred a month earlier and that the ALR “has done nothing to make improvements” to prevent her mother’s second fall off her bed and provide a timely response. The daughter wrote that without the hidden camera, the family wouldn’t have known what happened to her mother. She reported that the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) who watched the video didn’t investigate the alleged neglect pertaining to the fall and the failure of staff to respond to it. She added, “Facilities will never be held accountable. Lack of regulation and strong lobbying presence paid for by the assisted living groups doesn’t help us much either.”Permission to use information pertaining to this incident was given by the resident’s daughter.A Minnesota Senate Aging and Long-Term Care Policy Committee hearing was held on February 28, 2018. The committee heard from leaders of the long-term care (LTC) industry about the abuse and neglect stories reported in the Star Tribune Special Report entitled Left to Suffer: Abused, Ignored Across Minnesota (November 12-16, 2017).Patti Cullen, president and CEO, Care Providers of MN, said, “We are all deeply disturbed by the stories highlighted in the media.” Carli Lindemann, Vice President of Housing, Knute Nelson, Alexandria, Minnesota, asked, “Is there anything we could have done to prevent this from occurring?”The short answer is “Yes.”The warning signs for the current crisis in ALRs and “memory care” units in Minnesota have been widely known across the country for over 20 years. The table below outlines 16 warning signs, including government reports, research studies, and experts’ opinions.Chronology of Warning Signs in Assisted Living Industry – 1997 – 2018YearReport / Study / Experts’ Statement1.1997General Accounting Office report2.1999General Accounting Office study3.2003Hearing before the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging entitled Assisted Living: Examining the Assisted Living Workgroup Final Report 4.2004Article by Gruber-Baldini and colleagues5.2005Book by Robert Kane and Joan West It Shouldn’t Be This Way: The Failure of Long-Term Care6.2007Pace & Love’s book chapter7.2008Pace & Love’s “ostrich statement” and call for action8.2009Study by Hawes and Kimbell entitled Detecting, Addressing and Preventing Elder Abuse in Residential Care Facilities9.2011Study entitled Mistreatment in Assisted Living Facilities by Philips and Guo10.2012Hawes’s “ticking time bomb” interview with PBS Frontline11. 12.2013Large-scale study by Castle entitled An Examination of Resident Abuse in Assisted Living FacilitiesFrontline and ProPublica investigation and film entitled Life and Death in Assisted Living13.2013/4National study of Long-Term Care Providers; and Deadly Neglect report in San Diego County, California14.2014National study by Zimmerman, Sloane, & Read15.2015Report on growth in complaints of abuse, neglect, and exploitation between 2010 and 2015; and Review of practices and states’ regulatory activity by Brian Kaskie and colleagues2017-2018Star Tribune Special Report Left to Suffer; Report by Office of the Legislative Auditor of MN Evaluation of Minnesota Department of Health Office of Health Facility Complaints16.2018General Accounting Office study entitled Improved Federal Oversight of Beneficiary Health and Welfare is NeededFor detail about each of the warning signs, click here: downloadable versionReflection and Policy ImplicationsWere the numerous warning signs over the past two decades known to the leaders of the assisted living industry in Minnesota?During the Minnesota Senate Aging and Long-Term Care Policy Committee hearing held on February 28, 2018, Patti Cullen said, “We feel strongly about the need to focus on prevention.” She added: “The industry has zero tolerance for mistreatment.”If these warning signs were known, to what extent strong, proactive, anticipatory preventive steps were taken (in close collaboration with consumers, consumer advocacy organizations, and MDH) to develop and implement basic and effective measures to protect vulnerable and frail elders from abuse and neglect in ALRs in Minnesota?Governor Dayton told reporters after the Senate hearing on February 21, 2018, “Although the Department of Health is partially to blame, the real responsibility falls on each and every one of the care providers in the state’s facilities.” He added, “they need to fix the problems, stop breaking state laws and follow moral codes” (Channel 5 ABC Eyewitness News, February 22, 2018).For the leaders of the LTC industry in Minnesota to ignore the warning signs and allow ALRs to remain a registration-only entity may be at the very least considered immoral and irresponsible and at worse neglectful.Did the leaders of the LTC industry in Minnesota examine and give serious consideration to adopting the National Assisted Living Workgroup’s 110 recommendations for change including the recommendation to ensure that a state licensure for ALRs is implemented?Without a reform consisting a comprehensive set of basic safeguards in legislation to protect residents in this rapidly growing LTC setting, vulnerable and frail residents will continue to be at risk of neglect, abuse, avoidable accidents, and other forms of harm.During the Senate hearing held on February 28, 2018, Gayle Kvenvold, president and CEO, LeadingAge MN, expressed her “deepest apologies” to family members for the abuse and neglect experienced by their loved ones in LTC homes across the state.  She described the current state of affairs as “a watershed moment.”The sorely needed and long-overdue need for a licensure of ALRs in Minnesota combined with ALR’s industry commitment to implementation of evidence-based best care policies and practices will ultimately increase the likelihood that residents will remain safe and free from psychological harm.It will also fulfill the important promise of ALR as a safe care environment; one that is fully committed to ensuring that vulnerable and frail residents will experience the “highest practical medical, psychological, and social well-being.”It is their human right.ReferencesSerres, C. Star Tribune 5-Part Special Report entitled Left to Suffer: Senior Home Residents Abused, Ignored Across State, November 12-16, 2017.U.S. General Accounting Office. Long-Term Care: Consumer Protection and Quality of Care Issues in Assisted Living. Report to Ron Ryan, U.S. Senate, 1997.U.S. General Accounting Office. Assisted Living: Quality of Care and Consumer Protection Issues. Testimony before the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging, 1999.U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging. Assisted Living: Examining the Assisted Living Workgroup Final Report, April 29, 2003.Sloane, P.D., Zimmerman, S., & Ori, M. Care for persons with dementia. In: S. Zimmerman, S., Sloane, P.D. & Eckert, J.K. eds. Assisted living: Needs, practices, and policies in residential care for elderly. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001.Gruber-Baldini, A. L., Boustani, M., Sloane, P. D., & Zimmerman, S. Behavioral symptoms in residential care/assisted living facilities: Prevalence, risk factors, and medication management. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 2004; 52: 1610–1617.Kane, L. R. & West, C.J. It Shouldn’t Be This Way: The Failure of Long-Term Care. Vanderbilt University Press, 2005.Pace, D.D. & Love, K. Enhancing assisted living: Are collaborative stakeholder efforts necessary? In: Golant, S.M., and Hyde, J., eds. The Assisted Living Residence: A Vision for the Future. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008.Hawes, C. and Kimbell, A.N. Detecting, Addressing and Preventing Elder Abuse in Residential Care Facilities. Report to National Institute of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, 2009.Philips, L.R. and Guo, G. Mistreatment in Assisted Living Facilities: Complaints, substantiations and risk factors. The Gerontologist, 2011; 51(3): 343-353.Zimmerman, S., Gruber-Baldini, A.L., Sloane, P.D., Eckert, J.K., Hebel, J.R., Morgan, L.A., Stearns, S.C., Wildfire, J., Maganizer, J., Chen, H.C. & Konard, T.R. Assisted living and nursing homes: Apples and oranges? The Gerontologist, 2003; 43, Special Issue II: 107-117.Breslow, J.M. Assisted living is a “ticking time bomb.” Interview of Catherine Hawes. PBS Frontline 2013 (interview held on November 10, 2012).Castle, N. An Examination of Resident Abuse in Assisted Living Facilities. A report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice, 2013.Frontline and ProPublica. Life and Death in Assisted Living. PBS, 2012.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Study of Long-Term Care Providers. Fast Facts, 2013-14. National Center for Assisted Living.Schoch, D. & Sisson, P., Clark, M. (September 8, 2013). Deadly neglect at some San Diego County assisted living facilities. The Center for Health Reporting, University of Southern California.Zimmerman, S., Sloane, P.D., & Read, D. Dementia prevalence and care in assisted living. Health Affairs, 2014; 33(4): 658-666.National Consumer Voice for Quality of Long-Term Care (2018). More must be done to protect residents of assisted living facilities. News article, February 6, 2018.Kaskie, B.P. Policies to protect persons with dementia in assisted living: Déjà vu all over again? The Gerontologist, 2015; 55(2): 199-209.Institute of Medicine. Improving the quality of care in nursing homes, 1986. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.Office of the Legislative Auditor of Minnesota. Office of Health Facility Complaints. Evaluation Report, 2018.U.S. General Accounting Office. Medicaid Assisted Living Services: Improved Federal Oversight of Beneficiary Health and Welfare is Needed, 2018.Related PostsTweetShare20ShareEmail20 SharesTags: Assisted Living Dementia Minnesotalast_img read more

New WHO Global Action Plan for Physical Activity holds potential to protect

first_imgJun 5 2018The NCD Alliance has welcomed More Active People for a Healthier World, the new WHO Global Action Plan for Physical Activity (GAPPA) 2018-2030, launched today in Lisbon, saying it has the potential to prevent huge numbers of deaths and disability from noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) across the globe.“We´re at a tipping point when it comes to physical activity, said Katie Dain, CEO of the NCD Alliance, speaking at today´s launch. “For myriad reasons the world is just not active enough. In some populations, up to 80 per cent of adults are not sufficiently active to realize the protective benefits of physical activity, and are consequently at increased risk of poor health”.“But we optimistically believe that the new Action Plan can raise the profile and catalyze sustained changes that would help to protect millions of people from NCDs like cancer, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and mental disability.“Promoting physical activity is a cost effective, health and development promoting opportunity, and the Action Plan should catalyze governments and stakeholders to step up with action, collaboration and public policies that promote the wellbeing of all people everywhere for a more active and healthy world.”The new Action Plan was announced earlier today in Lisbon and later in the afternoon will feature a launch event to be held at the Headquarters of the Portuguese Football Federation. Katie Dain will join a number of key speakers at the event including WHO Director-General Dr Tedros and Prime Minister António Costa of Portugal. The NCD Alliance was a contributor to the Action Plan.Being sufficiently active can reduce the severity of existing NCDs and risk of developing other simultaneous conditions. Meanwhile, many actions to ensure environments are conducive to physical activity will also benefit , including road safety, air quality, and community cohesion, contributing win-win opportunities for both improving health and achieving other Sustainable Development Goals by 2030.Related StoriesExercise during pregnancy can promote bone health of both mother and childExposure to nearby greenspace associated with reduced cravingsReview provides new recommendations to manage menopausal symptoms after breast cancerAs with other NCD risk factors like unhealthy diets, tobacco and harmful alcohol use, the Action Plan recognizes that inequity is an underlying determinant of how active populations and groups within them are. While population-wide policies can strengthen accessibility, affordability and ensure everyone has the opportunity to be more active, targeted physical activity promotion is also necessary to ensure the more vulnerable and least active groups are not left behind.“Low- and middle-income countries are undergoing rapid globalization and urbanization as well as experiencing a transition from the burden of communicable to noncommunicable diseases – so it is timely that this this report provides impetus for integrating physical activity promoting policies through, for example, urban planning and workplace policies that facilitate physical activity,” said Dain.“With health systems in these countries not yet equipped to fully cope with chronic conditions, it is vital that health promotion and NCD prevention is a key element of planning for achievable and sustainable universal health coverage.“ Source:https://ncdalliance.org/news-events/news/new-who-global-action-plan-for-physical-activity-can-help-prevent-deaths-and-disability-from-ncdslast_img read more

Tipping the scales to initiate tumorigenesis in the colon

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 5 2018The regulatory protein c-MYC plays an important role in promoting the development of many types of tumors. c-MYC is a transcription factor that controls the activity of large numbers of genes involved in cell division, and its overexpression leads to excessive cell proliferation. A new study carried out by a team led by Professor Heiko Hermeking at the Institute of Pathology at LMU (and German Cancer Consortium) now shows that c-MYC induces the production of a transcription factor, which increases the numbers of stem cells in the intestinal epithelium, and thereby contributes to the formation of adenomas (“polyps”) in the colon. Their findings appear in the online journal “Nature Communications”.In approximately 90% of patients that present with colon carcinoma, the expression of the c-MYC protein is strongly increased due to mutations in the APC/beta-catenin pathway. As a result, the genes activated by c-MYC are themselves upregulated. Among the targets of c-MYC is the gene AP4, which codes for the transcription factor of the same name (AP4). Transcription factors like c-MYC and AP4 act as regulatory switches that enable the genetic information encoded in specific segments of the DNA to be transcribed into messenger RNA, which programs the synthesis of the corresponding proteins. Hermeking and his colleagues had previously demonstrated that AP4 promotes the metastasis of colon tumors (i.e., the migration of tumor cells into other tissues, where they can give rise to satellite tumors). “However, the normal function of the protein in the intestinal epithelium remained unknown, and whether or not it participates in primary tumorigenesis in the organ was unclear,” Hermeking explains.Related StoriesResearchers use AI to develop early gastric cancer endoscopic diagnosis systemStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyIn order to investigate this further, the researchers turned to an experimental mouse model for hereditary adenomatous polyposis of the colon in humans. In this ApcMin strain of mice, which is particularly prone to develop colon cancer, the team deleted the Ap4 gene specifically in the colon epithelium. “It turned out that mice which lacked the Ap4 protein developed significantly fewer tumors and survived for 100 days longer, on average, than did the mice that could still synthesize it,” says Hermeking. Surprisingly, the loss of Ap4 had no effect on the division rates of either normal or tumorous epithelial cells in the colon. Instead, deletion of Ap4 is associated with a reduction in the numbers of adult stem cells present in the tissue. “This finding confirms a recently proposed model, which postulates that the incidence of tumorigenesis is correlated with the number of stem cells in an organ. Stem cells are thus especially susceptible to malignant transformation,” says Hermeking.Further studies on cultured, tumor-derived, intestinal cells grown under conditions in which they form aggregations known as organoids and tumoroids validated the effect. Analysis of gene activity in these microstructures enabled the researchers to conclude that Ap4 acts on two crucial signaling pathways that regulate the balance between stem cell maintenance and differentiation, and tips the scales toward stem cells.Source: https://www.en.uni-muenchen.de/news/newsarchiv/2018/hermeking_ap4.htmllast_img read more

Death march of the penguins

Emperor penguin populations could plummet 19% by the end of the century, thanks—not surprisingly—to climate change, according to a new study. Emperor penguins breed and raise their chicks on Antarctica’s fringe of sea ice, and a constant amount of the frozen ocean water is vital to their survival. Too little sea ice, which harbors the penguin’s diet of squid, fish, and shrimplike critters called krill, means the penguins could go hungry. Too much ice and the birds have to travel farther to reach the ocean—a tough round trip for nonbreeding adults, but particularly for parents feeding their chicks. Climate change can have both direct and indirect impacts on sea ice extent in a given location, by not only warming temperatures and melting the ice, but also by altering wind patterns and wave heights that can push the ice around. Now, researchers have used climate projections of sea ice cover at the location of 45 known colonies to assess the impact of sea ice gain or loss on future penguin populations. Using demographic data from the well-studied colony at Terre Adélie in East Antarctica (the subject of the documentary March of the Penguins), the team determined that at least 75% of the emperor penguin colonies are vulnerable to changes in sea ice, they found, with 20% of the colonies heading for extinction by 2100, the team reports online today in Nature Climate Change. read more

President Obamas 1millionperson health study kicks off with five recruitment centers

first_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country President Obama, who first announced the PMI in January 2015, writes today in The Boston Globe that “the ensuing breakthroughs” from the PMI study could create jobs, improve health care, and “help people live longer, happier, and healthier lives.” President Barack Obama’s ambitious 1-million-person personalized medicine study began to take shape this week with the announcement of four medical centers that will recruit volunteers starting this fall. A fifth center aims to sign up 350,000 participants by blasting the general public with ads coming soon to your web browser or mobile phone.The White House’s announcement yesterday of $55 million in awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) fires the starting gun for the Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) Cohort Program. The plan is to recruit 1 million or more people who are willing to share their health and genetic information over many years to help researchers develop individualized treatments. Other countries have similar studies underway, but the U.S. version aims to be larger, more diverse, and more patient-centric—participants will help shape the study and be able to see their data. NIH Director Francis Collins calls it “the largest, most ambitious research project of this sort ever undertaken.” To create the cohort, NIH initially expected to link up existing large health studies with DNA samples, such as a huge biobank run by the health provider Kaiser Permanente in northern California. But an advisory group recommended recruiting new volunteers partly so that data and sample collection could be standardized. NIH then invited health care providers to apply to participate.The winners are four medical centers spread across the country: Columbia University Medical Center; Northwestern University in Chicago, Illinois; the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania; and the University of Arizona, Tucson. These centers are teaming up with local health care providers to find study volunteers.Each center will aim to enroll 10,000 participants in its first year starting in November, then 35,000 a year through 2020 to reach a total of 150,000. The $55 million in awards for the fiscal year ending on 30 September also includes funding to allow the Veterans Administration to recruit volunteers, and to help community health centers attract participants from low-income communities. More recruitment centers will be added later.Even the newly announced centers weren’t sure how the competition would play out—several favorites aren’t on the list, some researchers note. Geneticist David Goldstein, principal investigator for the Columbia center, thinks NIH favored applicants with the ability to securely share patients’ electronic health records and enroll a diverse group of people. Until now, most participants in large genetics studies have been white. “We are really going to fix that this time,” Goldstein says, in Columbia’s case by recruiting people from neighborhoods such as Harlem.One of the University of Arizona’s strengths is that is can draw on “a huge, diverse patient population,” notes center co-leader Elizabeth Calhoun. Its partner, Banner Health, treats patients across the Southwest, including Native Americans and many Latinos.NIH also wants to make it possible for “anyone in the United States to be able to raise their hand” and sign up, Collins says. To that end, the largest award ($20 million the first year) goes to Scripps Research Institute in San Diego, California, and Vibrent Health in Fairfax, Virginia, to run a center that aims to enroll 350,000 volunteers directly through the web, mobile apps and a call center. Scripps principal investigator Eric Topol says his center will work with Walgreens, Apple, Blue Cross, Verizon, and other companies on notifications and apps that will point potential volunteers to a nearby enrollment site. “We have the ability to touch almost every American through these different entities,” Topol says. His center will also develop wearable devices to record participants’ health data.The White House also announced a data center for the study run by Vanderbilt University in Nashville together with Verily (formerly Google Life Sciences) and the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In May, NIH awarded a contract to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, to maintain the study’s biobank of blood, urine, and other samples.There are still many details to be worked out. Study investigators are meeting at NIH this week to hash out matters such as what information to collect on a volunteer health questionnaire. But some aren’t waiting to get started. The University of Arizona plans to open a registry in the next few weeks to compile contact information for people who are potentially interested in the study, says principal investigator Akinlolu Ojo.Topol thinks NIH will have no trouble finding 1 million volunteers. “Just yesterday since this was announced, we’ve had hundreds of people contact Scripps saying they want to enroll. And we haven’t even started yet,” he says.last_img read more

Humans arent the only great apes that can read minds

first_img Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) All great mind reading begins with chocolate. That’s the basis for a classic experiment that tests whether children have something called theory of mind—the ability to attribute desires, intentions, and knowledge to others. When they see someone hide a chocolate bar in a box, then leave the room while a second person sneaks in and hides it elsewhere, they have to guess where the first person will look for the bar. If they guess “in the original box,” they pass the test, and show they understand what’s going on in the first person’s mind—even when it doesn’t match reality.For years, only humans were thought to have this key cognitive skill of attributing “false belief,” which is believed to underlie deception, empathy, teaching, and perhaps even language. But three species of great apes—chimpanzees, bonobos, and orangutans—also know when someone holds a false belief, according to a new study published today in Science. The groundbreaking study suggests that this skill likely can be traced back to the last common ancestor of great apes and humans, and may be found in other species.“Testing the idea that nonhuman [animals] can have minds has been the Rubicon that skeptics have again and again said no nonhuman has ever, or will ever, cross,” says Brian Hare, an evolutionary anthropologist at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, who was not involved in the study. “Well, back to the drawing board!”center_img For nearly 40 years, animal cognition researchers have had mixed results in showing that our close ape relatives—and animals such as monkeys, jays, and crows—understood that their fellows had minds, a talent thought to come in handy in complex societies, where figuring out another’s plans can help animals thrive. Some tests have shown that chimpanzees had some building blocks of theory of mind: They can deceive, recognize others’ motives, and remember who is a good partner on collaborative tasks. They can also tell what another chimp can and cannot see, and they can reason about the movement of objects they themselves can’t directly see. But they—and other primates—had not been shown to hold false belief.To get around this impasse, the scientists behind the new study turned to soap operas and high-tech eye-tracking technology. Like many of us, great apes love a good drama, says Christopher Krupenye, an evolutionary anthropologist also at Duke who co-led the study with Fumihiro Kano of Kyoto University in Japan. “When there’s confrontation between individuals, they’re curious about what will happen next,” he says, as evidenced by their widened eyes. So the scientists filmed a colleague dressed as a generic apelike figure, nicknamed King Kong, who steals a rock from a man, hides the rock in one of two boxes, and then scares the man away. While he’s gone, Kong hides the stone in the other box, but then changes his mind and carries it out of sight. What does the man do when he returns? Most of us would predict that he’ll search for the rock in the first box, where it was when he left the scene. To find out whether great apes think this, too, the scientists screened their movie to 14 chimpanzees, nine bonobos, and seven orangutans. Through an infrared eye-tracker, the researchers measured what the animals were watching throughout the film. When the man returned, 22 of the 30 animals looked directly at the boxes, with 17 staring at the first box, where Kong initially hid the rock. Their eye movements, the scientists say, show that these apes correctly guessed the man would open the box where he’d last seen the rock—even though the apes knew it was no longer there. The researchers got similar results from having 40 apes view another, slightly different, film.Unlike previous false-belief tests for great apes, this one doesn’t involve food, which has the unintended consequence of also testing their self-control, Krupenye says. “In our test, they only have to remember something that just happened; they aren’t weighed down by other cognitive demands.” The eye-tracking method also avoids using language, an unavoidable element of many theories of mind tests, says Frans de Waal, a primatologist at Emory University in Atlanta who was not involved in the study, but who wrote an accompanying perspective in Science.“It’s a very surprising and novel finding,” says Victoria Southgate, a developmental psychologist at the University of London, who helped create the eye-tracking technique to test 2-year-old infants and was not involved in this research. “It’s an almost exact replication of the study we did, and the apes appear to pass. It suggests that the capacity to track others’ perspectives and beliefs is not unique to humans.”But Laurie Santos, a cognitive psychologist at Yale University who has shown that rhesus macaques lack an understanding of false belief, thinks the “paper raises more questions than it provides answers,” especially because there have been “so many past results showing that chimpanzees and other primates lack this capacity.”Krupenye says he and his colleagues have more work to do before they can definitively conclude that apes understand false beliefs. “We’ve shown that they can predict others’ behaviors, which is a sophisticated ability,” and one not previously demonstrated. He and his colleagues say they now need to devise a behavioral scenario where the apes put their knowledge to use.Hare is looking forward to where the new study leads. “Now the fun begins!” Hare says he expects that movies and eye-tracking will soon be expanded to test other species. Krupenye agrees. “The eye-tracking program and mechanism would just have to be shaped for faces of birds, cats, dogs, or other species” to work. Of course, that means that other scientists will also have to come up with some funky, species-specific soap operas to test them on. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Picasso painted over another artists work—and then over his own new imaging

first_imgThis 1992 radiography image revealed a landscape scene hiding under the layers that Pablo Picasso painted. © Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) Pablo Picasso created La Miséreuse accroupie during his blue period, a time when he painted with shades of blue and blue-green. AUSTIN—Hidden beneath the brush strokes of Pablo Picasso’s 1902 oil painting La Miséreuse accroupie (The Crouching Beggar) lies the work of another Barcelona, Spain, artist. And the underlying work seems to have inspired some of Picasso’s artistry. Mountains in the original painting—a landscape scene—became the outline of the back of the subject in Picasso’s work, which depicts a crouching, cloaked woman.Experts have known about the hidden image since 1992, when the underlying layers of the painting were first probed using x-ray radiography. But new work, using modern imaging techniques, is revealing more detail—not only about the original painting, but also about Picasso’s. Researchers discovered another hidden layer: Under the woman’s cloak, Picasso painted an image of her hand clutching a piece of bread, the team announced here today at the annual meeting of AAAS, which publishes Science.The discovery allows us “to look inside Picasso’s head and get a sense of how he was making decisions as he was painting the canvas,” says Marc Walton, a cultural heritage scientist at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, and a lead researcher on the study. “He reworked, he labored on painting this individual element, but then chose to abandon it at the end.” © Picasso Estate Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country This type of imaging isn’t new, but the instrumentation is. In the past, the technique could only be done in a lab outfitted with expensive equipment. Walton and his colleagues designed a “simple, do it yourself type of kit” that’s easy to bring to an art gallery and only costs $1000, assuming a researcher already has a hand-held x-ray reflectance spectrometer (common at many cultural heritage institutions, Walton says). Many institutions don’t “want a work of art to travel, so we can now bring the techniques to the museum,” he says.It’s “phenomenal” work—both in terms of what it reveals about Picasso’s artistry and the development of new technology, says Jennifer Mass, a cultural heritage scientist at the Scientific Analysis of Fine Art in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, who has done similar imaging work on another one of Picasso’s paintings but was not involved in the new research. “It’s quite an advance in the field of what’s possible inside a museum.”It has also sparked new lines of inquiry into the painting’s history. Brummel, who traveled to Barcelona 2 weeks ago on an investigative trip, is trying to unravel who painted the scene that Picasso brushed over. He figured out that it depicts a location near Barcelona. And information about what kinds of paints were used, which is now being compiled with the new data, will tell him about the painter’s palette and whether it was a daytime or nighttime scene—information that “will be key to [help] figure out who painted it and when,” he says.Check out all of our coverage of AAAS 2018. © Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) Emailcenter_img Researchers set up an x-ray fluorescence instrument to probe the underlying layers of Pablo Picasso’s painting La Miséreuse accroupie. During recent conservation work at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto, Canada—where La Miséreuse accroupie is housed—conservator Sandra Webster-Cook noticed colors and textures “peeking through the crack lines” that didn’t match up with what was on the painting’s surface. She wondered whether it was part of the underlying landscape image or whether it was something else, so she and curator Kenneth Brummel asked experts in noninvasive imaging techniques to dig deeper below the painting’s surface.  Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Katie LanginFeb. 17, 2018 , 10:00 AM First up was John Delaney, an imaging scientist at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., who took snapshots of the painting using hyperspectral infrared reflectography, a technique that involves shining light of different wavelengths on an object—some of which probe deeper than others. (Paint becomes transparent at certain wavelengths, depending on what it’s made of.) After analyzing the light reflected off the painting, he could see the original landscape image—but he could also see, for the first time, Picasso’s hidden hand. It “was exciting for us to discover that” Picasso made changes to his painting, Webster-Cook says.To get a more detailed look at the hidden hand, Walton and his colleagues analyzed the painting using macro x-ray fluorescence imaging. The instrument, which zaps a painting with x-rays, allows researchers to see what chemical elements—lead, cadmium, iron—are present in different parts of the painting, not only at the surface, but also in deeper layers. And that’s useful because it can provide a window into nonsurface layers and tell experts about the colors used to paint them. There’s a lot of lead, for instance, in the white paint that Picasso used—and the hidden hand, painted with white, was particularly visible in the image showing where lead-based paint was applied, the team reported. Picasso painted over another artist’s work—and then over his own, new imaging revealslast_img read more

Crashout Brexit looms larger for scientists after deal rejected

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Erik StokstadJan. 16, 2019 , 2:55 PM Crash-out Brexit looms larger for scientists after deal rejected A historic defeat for U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May has raised the odds that the United Kingdom will crash out of the European Union in March, a prospect that scientists dread for its potential for disruption to research collaborations and the economy. On 15 January, Parliament roundly rejected May’s deal with the European Union, which lays out the terms for an orderly withdrawal. What happens next is unknown.“Yesterday’s unprecedented vote makes the prospect of leaving the EU without a deal even more likely,” said Venki Ramakrishnan, president of the Royal Society in London, in a statement. “A no-deal Brexit would be a disaster for British science and innovation and I urge our elected representatives to put the interests of the country first and get a new plan to prevent this catastrophic outcome.”After a 2016 referendum, in which a majority of 51.9% voted to leave Europe, May invoked Article 50 of the European Union’s Treaty of Lisbon. This action set 29 March as the date of departure. In November 2018, May’s negotiators reached an agreement with the European Union over the terms of the departure, spelling out the United Kingdom’s remaining financial obligations to the European Union and specifying a 2-year period to smooth the transition. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Emailcenter_img Frank Augstein/AP Photo Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country As expected, Parliament has rejected this deal. Proponents of Brexit, for example, say the deal keeps too many ties to the European Union. May must return to Parliament within 3 days to present an alternative. But given the European Union’s negotiating stance, there is little she can do to make the deal more palatable to its opponents. With Parliament deadlocked, some observers say a second referendum is needed to allow the people to vote on the deal and additional options. Others suggest a general election should be called. If nothing happens, the United Kingdom will by default leave without a deal.The consequences for the nation, including scientists, could be severe. The economy is predicted to take a hit and could remain hindered for years—with possible ramifications for funding of science. Without adequate preparations at the border, imports could slow to a crawl. Some scientists fear this could lead to shortages of crucial reagents or other laboratory supplies.In the event of a no-deal exit, the ability of U.K. researchers to apply for EU funding would immediately cease, and collaborations on international clinical trials and other research projects could also be affected. U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May’s compromise Brexit deal was rejected by Parliament.last_img read more

Radar reveals a second potential impact crater under Greenlands ice

first_img Radar reveals a second potential impact crater under Greenland’s ice By Paul VoosenFeb. 12, 2019 , 5:30 PM Although that may seem an implausible coincidence, other unrelated impact pairs have been found in Ukraine and Canada. And the rate of cosmic collisions needed to achieve such a coincidence is possible, given recent studies charting an uptick in Earth’s bombardment by extraterrestrial objects over the past 300 million years. NASA SCIENTIFIC VISUALIZATION STUDIO Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Just months after revealing an impact crater the size of Washington, D.C., buried under the ice of northwestern Greenland, a team of scientists has discovered that it has company: a large depression 180 kilometers away that may also be an asteroid or comet impact crater.Several years ago, after researchers spotted the first crater hiding in plain sight under Greenland’s Hiawatha Glacier, they began to scour satellite records and ice-penetrating radar profiles for other circular deformations. Profiles from NASA’s IceBridge research flights revealed a 36-kilometer-wide, bowl-shaped depression surrounded by a rim, with a collection of raised peaks in the center resembling the uplift left after an asteroid or comet strikes Earth’s surface.But unlike the Hiawatha crater, the basin hasn’t yet yielded shocked quartz crystals, considered to be the best evidence of an extraterrestrial impact. The basin appears eroded and filled with ice older than Hiawatha’s crater, both of which suggest that, if it is a crater, it likely came from a different impact, the researchers write this week in Geophysical Research Letters.last_img read more

New fuel cell could help fix the renewable energy storage problem

first_img iStock.com/Ron_Thomas By Robert F. ServiceMar. 12, 2019 , 1:00 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Novel fuel cells can help store electricity from renewables, such as wind farms, by converting it into a chemical fuel for long-term storage and then changing it back to electricity when needed. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe If we want a shot at transitioning to renewable energy, we’ll need one crucial thing: technologies that can convert electricity from wind and sun into a chemical fuel for storage and vice versa. Commercial devices that do this exist, but most are costly and perform only half of the equation. Now, researchers have created lab-scale gadgets that do both jobs. If larger versions work as well, they would help make it possible—or at least more affordable—to run the world on renewables.The market for such technologies has grown along with renewables: In 2007, solar and wind provided just 0.8% of all power in the United States; in 2017, that number was 8%, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. But the demand for electricity often doesn’t match the supply from solar and wind. In sunny California, for example, solar panels regularly produce more power than needed in the middle of the day, but none at night, after most workers and students return home.Some utilities are beginning to install massive banks of batteries in hopes of storing excess energy and evening out the balance sheet. But batteries are costly and store only enough energy to back up the grid for a few hours at most. Another option is to store the energy by converting it into hydrogen fuel. Devices called electrolyzers do this by using electricity—ideally from solar and wind power—to split water into oxygen and hydrogen gas, a carbon-free fuel. A second set of devices called fuel cells can then convert that hydrogen back to electricity to power cars, trucks, and buses, or to feed it to the grid.center_img New fuel cell could help fix the renewable energy storage problem But commercial electrolyzers and fuel cells use different catalysts to speed up the two reactions, meaning a single device can’t do both jobs. To get around this, researchers have been experimenting with a newer type of fuel cell, called a proton conducting fuel cell (PCFC), which can make fuel or convert it back into electricity using just one set of catalysts.PCFCs consist of two electrodes separated by a membrane that allows protons across. At the first electrode, known as the air electrode, steam and electricity are fed into a ceramic catalyst, which splits the steam’s water molecules into positively charged hydrogen ions (protons), electrons, and oxygen molecules. The electrons travel through an external wire to the second electrode—the fuel electrode—where they meet up with the protons that crossed through the membrane. There, a nickel-based catalyst stitches them together to make hydrogen gas (H2). In previous PCFCs, the nickel catalysts performed well, but the ceramic catalysts were inefficient, using less than 70% of the electricity to split the water molecules. Much of the energy was lost as heat.Now, two research teams have made key strides in improving this efficiency. They both focused on making improvements to the air electrode, because the nickel-based fuel electrode did a good enough job. In January, researchers led by chemist Sossina Haile at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, reported in Energy & Environmental Science that they came up with a fuel electrode made from a ceramic alloy containing six elements that harnessed 76% of its electricity to split water molecules. And in today’s issue of Nature Energy, Ryan O’Hayre, a chemist at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, reports that his team has done one better. Their ceramic alloy electrode, made up of five elements, harnesses as much as 98% of the energy it’s fed to split water.When both teams run their setups in reverse, the fuel electrode splits H2 molecules into protons and electrons. The electrons travel through an external wire to the air electrode—providing electricity to power devices. When they reach the electrode, they combine with oxygen from the air and protons that crossed back over the membrane to produce water.The O’Hayre group’s latest work is “impressive,” Haile says. “The electricity you are putting in is making H2 and not heating up your system. They did a really good job with that.” Still, she cautions, both her new device and the one from the O’Hayre lab are small laboratory demonstrations. For the technology to have a societal impact, researchers will need to scale up the button-size devices, a process that typically reduces performance. If engineers can make that happen, the cost of storing renewable energy could drop precipitously, helping utilities do away with their dependence on fossil fuels. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Emaillast_img read more

Dominicas readiness for 2019 hurricane season being assessed

first_imgShareTweetSharePinNational Disaster Coordinator, Fitzroy PascalNational Disaster Coordinator Fitzroy Pascal says assessments are being done to determine Dominica’s readiness for this hurricane season.The sub committees of the National Emergency Planning Organisation (NEPO) met at the Office of Disaster Management at Jimmit on Wednesday.Pascal said it is of vital importance that an assessment be made of the readiness of the national mechanism to face another hurricane season which has already begun.He added that hydro meteorological events are not the only hazards that the island faces, therefore, preparedness is not only geared towards tropical cyclones or other related events but also natural hazards.“Our recent experience with a major disaster resulting from Hurricane Maria has provided a first hand view of the many challenges associated with responding to such events and the eventual task of recovery and rebuilding, he stated”He said the challenge is to determine the level of readiness of the national system which is fully dependent on the work done by the various sub committees tasked with particular responsibilities.Pascal told participants at Wednesday’s meeting that some of the concerns ahead of the hurricane season are being addressed.“During Hurricane Preparedness Week, field exercises were conducted by the ODM along with other sub committee chairpersons in eight districts across the island which was done in an effort to bring critical feedback from disaster committees and other community leader on their state of readiness for the season,” he remarked.The National Disaster Coordinator said this provided the opportunity to gain personal experience on the ground scenarios in the communities which will certainly help in the decision making process.“Some of the concerns that were raised including the availability and operation of suitable shelters, are being addressed and this should place the country in a much better position when compared to last year,” he stated.last_img read more

Winslow election deadlines noted

first_imgNovember 1, 2017 By L. Parsons The Winslow City Council passed a resolution last week establishing an election date, designating the election as a mail ballot, and establishing deadlines for voter registration and candidate nomination. The City ofSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad Winslow election deadlines notedlast_img

Holbrook Council hears APS concerns of NextGen initiative

first_imgJuly 17, 2018 Holbrook Council hears APS concerns of NextGen initiative By Toni Gibbons Neil Travor with Arizona Public Service (APS) addressed the Holbrook City Council on July 10 regarding the Clean Energy for a Healthy Arizona Amendment that will be voted on in November. TravorSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img

We are headed for a very dark period Brazils researchers fear election

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Historically, Bolsonaro has had little to do with science, and he recently sparred with the academic community, authoring legislation to favor an unproven cancer therapy. A general he picked to craft his science and education plans defended the teaching of creationism this week, telling O Estado de S. Paulo that students need to know that “Darwin existed,” but not necessarily to “agree with him.”Climate change is one scientific issue Bolsonaro has touched on. He hasn’t specifically questioned that humans are driving global warming, but his son, a popular Brazilian congressman, has done so in a video that celebrates the climate policies of U.S. President Donald Trump. And Bolsonaro has indicated that the Paris agreement’s mandate threatens Brazil’s national sovereignty, especially in the Amazon region, where deforestation for farming and cattle ranching has driven most of the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions.Through law enforcement and mechanisms such as incentives for sustainable practices, Brazilian authorities have substantially reduced Amazon deforestation in the past 13 years, and the nation’s commitment to the Paris climate change accord requires it to continue that trend. Bolsonaro’s campaign instead promises to promote agriculture and mining in the region. One of the generals helping develop the candidate’s policies told O Estado de S. Paulo last week that he missed the days when road builders could cut down trees in the Amazon without being bothered by environmental authorities.Unfettered development of the Amazon would be a “grave mistake,” says Eduardo Assad, a climate change and agricultural scientist at the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation in Campinas. He adds that studies show Brazil’s agricultural production could be doubled by exploiting abandoned or degraded pastures and farmland—“without any additional deforestation.”Haddad, a 55-year-old professor of political science at USP, offers more moderate views, focusing on social justice and sustainable development. But corruption scandals that culminated in the impeachment of Brazil’s then-President Dilma Rousseff in August 2016 and the recent imprisonment of former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who is closely associated with Haddad, have darkened his prospects. In a poll out on 15 October, he trailed Bolsonaro 41% to 59%.Haddad’s campaign has pledged to “rebuild the national science, technology, and innovation system” and provide ample public funding to help double the intensity of the country’s R&D expenditure to 2% of gross domestic product (GDP) by the year 2030. In his campaign’s draft science document, Bolsonaro pledges even more R&D investment, 2.5% of GDP by the end of his term, in 2022.Many researchers doubt that either candidate can fulfill such pledges. “I’ve heard this promise many times before,” says Fernando Peregrino, a science policy expert and president of Confies in Brasília, a national network of foundations that support scientific research and higher education. Brazil lacks the economic policies and fiscal stability to provide generous support for R&D, he believes.Bolsonaro plans to rely heavily on the private sector to boost R&D spending, through economic incentives and partnerships. “Our greatest deficit is in innovation,” says economist Marcos Cintra, president of the Brazilian Research and Innovation Agency in Rio de Janeiro, who is helping craft Bolsonaro’s R&D proposals.As for public spending, the campaign document calls for a “greater balance” between “curiosity-oriented research and research directed towards missions and goals.” Brazil’s Ministry of Education now receives 60% of federal R&D funds, compared with the Ministry of Defense’s 1.5%, and Cintra argues defense should get more. “One of the political difficulties is that public research in Brazil still has a strong academic bias, without focus or specific priorities,” Bolsonaro’s campaign document says.Luiz Davidovich, president of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences in Rio de Janeiro, agrees that it’s important to define national priorities and strategic goals, but says academic and intellectual freedom must also be preserved.Whoever wins the election, scientists here are unlikely to see any relief soon. Federal funding for the Ministry of Science, Technology, Innovation, and Communication has fallen by more than half since 2013, and the budget proposal for 2019—drafted by the current administration—predicts another 10% cut below this year’s.“Even for the most optimistic of us, it’s looking bad,” Artaxo says. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The 63-year-old congressman and former army captain fell just short of winning a majority in the primary election earlier this month, and he heads into a 28 October runoff with a large lead in the polls over left-wing scholar Fernando Haddad. The plight of Brazil’s research establishment, which has endured sharp budget cuts in recent years, has had little mention in the campaigning so far. When recently asked about his possible choice for science minister, Bolsonaro named Brazilian astronaut and former air force pilot Marcos Pontes, a member of his party, as his top preference.A draft campaign document focusing on science—first revealed last week by the Brazilian newspaper O Estado de S. Paulo—offers additional insight into his plans. It pledges to more than double the level of R&D investment in the next 4 years, but would focus most of the extra money and attention on applied sciences such as space and robotics, rather than on basic research at universities.Under the slogan “Brazil above everything, God above all,” Bolsonaro’s campaign exalts national pride, military discipline, and a zero-tolerance, iron-fist stance against crime. Famous for inflammatory remarks about women and minorities, Bolsonaro openly cherishes the 21-year military dictatorship that started with a coup in 1964. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Herton EscobarOct. 16, 2018 , 5:10 PM Beset by economic woes and dissatisfied with the left-wing politicians in power for most of the past 15 years, Brazil appears poised to make a hard turn and elect a far-right candidate, Jair Bolsonaro, as its next president. His rapid ascent has unnerved local researchers, who worry about the future of Brazilian science, the protection of the country’s biodiversity, and its role in the global struggle against climate change.“I think we are headed for a very dark period in the history of Brazil,” says Paulo Artaxo, a climate change researcher at the University of São Paulo (USP) in São Paulo, Brazil. “There is no point sugarcoating it. Bolsonaro is the worst thing that could happen for the environment.”Bolsonaro has vowed to withdraw Brazil from the 2015 Paris agreement, which requires nations to reduce greenhouse emissions to combat climate change, and he plans to eliminate the Ministry of the Environment and fold its duties into the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, and Supply. The “Myth”—as his supporters call him—has also said, while campaigning in the Amazon, that Brazil has “too many protected areas” that “stand in the way of development.” Email Jair Bolsonaro, front-runner for Brazil’s presidency, is a scary prospect for some.  ‘We are headed for a very dark period.’ Brazil’s researchers fear election of far-right presidential candidate Victor Moriyama/Stringer/Getty Images Jair Bolsonaro leads in the polls for Brazil’s presidential election. Andre Coelho/Bloomberg/Getty Images last_img read more

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